Tuesday, May 12, 2009

In the Name of Jesus, 5/12

The book “Breaking the Missional Code,” which I (don't recommend but) will be discussing tomorrow with my Learner's Community, asks an interesting question which the authors hope will spur pastors and people on to great things. They ask, “What is God doing among the unchurched/unreached?” They say, “It is arrogant to assume that God is not already at work in most places.” Their conclusion is that all we, as the Church, need to do, is find out how and where God is already working in the lives of the unbaptized, and then join him in achieving great things.

Truly, I couldn't think of a more terrible way to go about being missionaries in our community.

In the margins of the book, where I often scribble my comments, arguments and frustrations with a book, in chicken scratches you can find my answer to the question. What is God doing among the unchurched/unreached? “He is killing them.

continue reading in the "Revitalization Words" section of this week's In the Name of Jesus.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

This lady isn't Lutheran but makes an interesting point that we shouldn't neglect our "mission" to our own children. It causes me to ponder who will evangelize the world when we are gone.

http://proverbs14verse1.blogspot.com/2009/11/mission-field.html

Much as it grieves me to think of children on the other side of the world spending eternity apart from God, the thought of my own children permanently separated from Him is with me night and day. Perhaps it is wrong of me, but I feel that there is so much outward focus that our own children sometimes don't get the teaching they need to grow. In fact valuing and training our own children better could actually be more efficient than just dumping more dollars on foreign endeavors. Enthusiastically sharing our faith with our children makes it more likely that there will even be another generation of faithful servants. At the beginning of the last century the ratio of Christians to non Christians was far more favorable than it is now and I would suggest that this is due in part to the fact that we in the west focused too much on material needs of the lost and far too little on the spiritual needs of our own children and the spiritual needs of those we helped materially.

Anyway, I think it would be really exciting if the LCMS would offer a conference on the theme of this one:

http://www.visionforumministries.org/events/bc/

I am taking my son to this conference so that he can at least consider the idea that children(rewards) are sent by the God as part of his kingdom and not just something to be prevented at all cost so we can send more of our income to provide for the material needs but only minimally for the spiritual needs of folks far away. This leads into my continuing struggle with the notion that some of the truly lost and poor have much in common with the truly lost and rich who just plain reject Christ. At which point I feel they really aren't so different from each other. That is they can't have peace or fullness in life and the problem isn't their material situation. I think much of this stems from secular pressure to provide material assistance to the poor which of course has little purpose past the immediate. The poor could be better served even in their material condition by the Ten Commandments than by a never ending stream of UN food aid, condoms, and AIDS meds which are bandaids that just perpetuate their lost condition. Acts of mercy without Christ really aren't so merciful after all. Having fewer of your own children so that there will be more to share with the poor in the short term seems contrary to how the Lord want us to grow and share. Did anyone in the LCMS suggest that we should have fewer kids so we can share more with the poor? Not that I know of. However the secular world says it constantly and I haven't heard many beyond the Pope outright reject and condemn such a view.

Okay, I have prattled on long enough and may have talked myself into a corner. However, any thoughts or direction would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Anonymous said...

This lady isn't Lutheran but makes an interesting point that we shouldn't neglect our "mission" to our own children. It causes me to ponder who will evangelize the world when we are gone.

http://proverbs14verse1.blogspot.com/2009/11/mission-field.html

Much as it grieves me to think of children on the other side of the world spending eternity apart from God, the thought of my own children permanently separated from Him is with me night and day. Perhaps it is wrong of me, but I feel that there is so much outward focus that our own children sometimes don't get the teaching they need to grow. In fact valuing and training our own children better could actually be more efficient than just dumping more dollars on foreign endeavors. Enthusiastically sharing our faith with our children makes it more likely that there will even be another generation of faithful servants. At the beginning of the last century the ratio of Christians to non Christians was far more favorable than it is now and I would suggest that this is due in part to the fact that we in the west focused too much on material needs of the lost and far too little on the spiritual needs of our own children and the spiritual needs of those we helped materially.

Anyway, I think it would be really exciting if the LCMS would offer a conference on the theme of this one:

http://www.visionforumministries.org/events/bc/

I am taking my son to this conference so that he can at least consider the idea that children(rewards) are sent by the God as part of his kingdom and not just something to be prevented at all cost.

Okay, I have prattled on long enough and may have talked myself into a corner. However, any thoughts or direction would be appreciated.

Thanks.

RevFisk said...

Thank you for the comment. :) I agree with most of what you have said. I have been deeply saddened by the rather limited "pro-life" movement which was stopped short of being "pro-creation." It seems silly to me that we raise hue and cry over homosexual marriage, while insisting that one of God's (three) purposes for marriage is one we can decide to do without. But that's another story...

God bless!

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